Monthly Archives: September 2015

Trig Lane

Above: View looking east at the archaeological site excavated 1974-76 on the west side of Trig Lane. “Upper Thames Street – Part 4” Today Trig Lane is just the name of a modern street that was laid out, probably in … Continue reading

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St Benet, Paul’s Wharf

Above: The unusual sight of an open view of the church, in June 1971. This was not due to bomb damage but clearance of the site in order to build a new access road and erect a large office block. … Continue reading

Posted in Castle Baynard (City) | 2 Comments

Baynard’s Castle

Above: A rather fanciful colour depiction of Baynard’s Castle probably made in the late 1700s. It is attractive, which is why it is shown here. It is probably based on an earlier more accurate (but less visually interesting) drawing. The … Continue reading

Posted in Castle Baynard (City) | 11 Comments

Puddle Dock

Above: The old dock from a picture in ‘Wonderful London’ (Vol 1, p146), edited by St John Adcock and published about 1926. “Upper Thames Street – Part 1” We start our journey along Upper Thames Street at its western end … Continue reading

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Upper Thames Street Introduction

Above: Small version of the Ordnance Survey map for some time around the 1900s. It should be noted that in medieval times what we call ‘Upper Thames Street’ was part of an even longer street which included today’s ‘Lower Thames … Continue reading

Posted in Castle Baynard (City), Queenhithe (City), Vintry (City), Walbrook (City) | Tagged | Leave a comment

Blackfriars Station Place Names

Above: The large stone ‘wall’ inscribed with destinations of English and Continental destinations. At one time the name Blackfriars Station referred to a railway terminus on the south side of the Thames, built over the western end of Bankside (Street), … Continue reading

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Rush Hour (Public Art)

Completed in 1987, ‘Rush Hour’ was the design of George Segal (1924 – 2000) an artist born in the USA. It represents the end of the day and the office workers want to get home. The six bronze figures look … Continue reading

Posted in Bishopsgate (City) | 1 Comment